EU efficiency morse code

De-mystifying EU pump legislation for the pump industry.

One of the EU’s biggest legislative focuses is improving energy efficiency within building services and achieving a significant overall reduction in carbon emissions. Heating systems, particularly pumps, are covered by a number of different pieces of legislation aimed at tackling CO2 with many set to incrementally update minimum targets over the coming years. Despite European legislation significantly impacting on everyone within the HVAC industry – from an independent installer to global manufacturers – many of the specific metrics which the industry is required to meet can be lost in translation. Below is a brief overview of some of the most relevant pieces of EU legislation and what they mean for both installers and end-users.

European Union legislation.

1) Eco Design Directive/Energy-using Products Directive (EuP) (EC 641-2009)
In 2005 the European Commission launched a framework directive intended to half EU member states’ CO2 emissions by 2020. In 2009 it became known as the Energy-using Products Directive (EuP).

2) Energy-related Products Directive (ErP)
The EuP Directive expanded in 2009 to include energy-related products and renamed the ErP Directive Energy-related products are defined as products which use energy, or those that have an indirect impact on energy consumption.

It covers any product within a heating system which consumes energy (e.g. not just boilers).

Approximately 14 million domestic circulators are placed into the global community annually. Due to regular operation over extended timeframes circulators were identified as a key product which needed drastic efficiency improvements. The energy labelling aspect of ErP is due to be relaunched from September 2015 for the total installed system.

Efficiency metrics under the ErP Directive.

Lowara ecocirc XL3) Energy Efficiency Index (EEI) – circulators
A new ratings system under the ErP Directive for energy-related products, including circulator pumps replaced the previously used A-G rating system as of 1st January 2013. From this date, all new and replacement circulator pumps are required to have a maximum EEI value of 0.27 from 0.4
As of 1st August 2015 all circulator pumps must have a minimum EEI value of 0.23 to comply with the ErP Directive. This means that from 1st August 2015 only variable speed circulator pumps with a permanent-magnet motor are allowed on the market.

Drinking water circulators will not apply under the directive. Drinking water circulators are specifically designed to be used in the re-circulation of drinking water as defined in Council Directive 98/83/EC.

PLMmotor14) Premium efficiency motors – IE2 and IE3
IEC standard for Rotating Electrical Machines – Part 30: defines three classes of motor efficiency for single-speed, three-speed and cage-induction motors

IE 1 – standard efficiency; IE 2 – high efficiency; IE3 – premium efficiency.

Under the EU Meps Directive, from 16th June 2011 all new motors must meet the IE2 efficiency legislation.
From 1st January 2015, motors with a rated output of 7.5 – 375kW must meet IE3 legislation, or IE2 level if fitted with a variable speed drive. From 1st January 2017, smaller motors with a rated output of 0.75 – 375kW must meet IE3 legislation, or IE2 level if fitted with a variable speed drive. IE3 Motors are fitted as standard and the energy saving can be improved fitting Hydrovar variable speed drives, IE4 motors are available as an option.

Lowara e-SH5) Mean Efficiency Index (MEI) – clean water pumps
Under the ErP Directive (formerly the Eco Design Directive), the Minimum Efficiency Index (MEI) identifies the minimum hydraulic efficiency levels manufacturers must meet.

An MEI rating is determined by a pump’s head, flow, speed and a constant depending on the design of the pump being measured.

An MEI must be calculated at three different levels:
First at the Best Efficiency Point (BEP) – the operating point at which the pump runs at maximum hydraulic efficiency.
Secondly at the Part Load (PL) – the operating point at which the pump is operating at 75% of the flow is at the BEP.
Finally at the Over Load (OL) – the operating point at which the pump runs at 110% of the BEP.

From 1st January 2013, all water pumps were required to be operating with an MEI rating of greater than or equal to 0.1.
From 1st January 2015, all water pumps are required to be operating with an MEI rating of greater than or equal to 0.4.

The directive effects affects: end-suction own bearing pumps; end-suction closed coupled pumps; close coupled in-line pumps; vertical multistage pumps; submersible multistage pumps.

 

Milestones

From 1 January, 2015

Motors with a rated output of 7.5 – 375 kW must meet either IE3 efficiency level or IE2 level if fitted with a variable speed drive.
Clean water pumps must have a MEI greater than 0,4.

From 1 January, 2017

The regulation now covers also the smaller sizes and all motors with a rated output of 0.75 – 375 kW must meet either IE3 efficiency level or IE2 level if fitted with a variable speed drive.

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From 1 January, 2013

Circulators must be A-classed. The EEI-index for A-class will change from 0,4 to 0,27.
Clean water pumps must have a MEI greater than 0,1.

From 1 August, 2015

For stand-alone and new installed integrated circulators the EEI must be ≤ 0,23.

From 1 January, 2020

For replacement circulators integrated in products the EEI must be ≤ 0,23.